2019 March Holiday Maths Camp

Using the conceptual approach, this 2-day camp will help pupils improve their word problem solving skills by focusing on key Maths concepts.

  • P3: variety of Whole Number word problems
  • P4: Whole Number and Fraction word problems
  • P5: variety of topical word problems
  • P6: past PSLE questions, Speed and Percentage word problems

 

Spaces are limited, so call 6777 2468 or SIGN UP ONLINE today!

LiteracyPlus Tidbits: P6 vs S1 English

 PRIMARY 6 vs SECONDARY 1 ENGLISH

 

Editing

Primary 6

  • All errors underlined
  • Includes spelling errors

Secondary 1

  • All errors unmarked
  • Only grammar-related errors
  • Need to identify 2 error-free lines

 

Continuous Writing

Primary 6

  • 1 prompt
  • With supporting visuals & helping questions
  • Pupils usually write narratives

Secondary 1

  • Choose 1 out of 4 topics to write about
  • No supporting visuals & helping questions
  • Topics may cover different text types

 

Visual Text Comprehension

Primary 6

  • More text than visual
  • MCQ

Secondary 1

  • More visual than text
  • Open-ended
  • Tests critical thinking skills & ability to evaluate use of visuals and language for impact

 

Reading Comprehension

Primary 6

  • 1 x narrative text
  • Reference to text by line number

Secondary 1

  • 1 x narrative text & 1 x non-narrative text
  • Questions organised by paragraph
  • Includes summary writing

 

Oral

Primary 6

  • Read fluently for Reading Aloud
  • Stimulus-based Conversation is a discussion based on a prompt

Secondary 1

  • Assume character/role or person stated for Reading Aloud
  • Spoken Interaction is a discussion based on a picture

 

English Usage Tips: Grammar

GRAMMAR: PREPOSITIONS

  • on OR in OR at?

A:  Listen – is this right: ‘I live on 99 Bishan Road’?

B:  No, that’s wrong! You live in 99 Bishan Road.

C:  Both wrong! You live at 99 Bishan Road.

Who is right? In is generally used when we talk about a location ‘inside’ something (in the house, in the theatre). On is used for a location ‘on top of’ something (on the table, on the floor), and at is used for a location which is a point on a horizontal or vertical surface (at the end of the drive, at the window). The problem is that there are different ways of looking at the same location.

But C is right.

At is used when street numbers are mentioned because we think of a particular point along the street, namely No. 99.

 

PSLE Changes & Model Drawing

Unsure of the latest PSLE changes and its implications? This is the perfect workshop for you. In addition, learn how model drawing can be effectively applied to make solving word problems easier for your child.

Join us at our hands-on workshop and learn from our Head of Mathematics, Mrs Edna Wong, a former HOD with more than 15 years of primary school teaching experience.

 

Click on the flyer below for workshop details.

Spaces are limited, so call 6777 2468 or SIGN UP ONLINE today!

2018 Year-end Holiday Programmes

Our year-end holiday programme schedule is out! Check out the different holiday programmes we are running for N1 to P6 students by clicking the images below.

 

N1-K2 The Big Hungry Bear

This workshop for preschoolers is not to be missed. Centered around the famous children’s book The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and The Big Hungry Bear, there will be storytelling, readers’ theatre, educational games, as well as a hands-on activity where children make their own Hungry Bear sandwich!

 

P1 Superheroes Writing Programme

Does your child have difficulty expressing himself/herself in writing? Taught in a safe and encouraging environment, pupils will learn how to write creatively ​on the theme​ of Superheroes. ​They will learn how to brainstorm descriptive words and phrases before putting their ideas into writing.  Using interactive activities such as storytelling, dramatisation ​and kinaesthetic games, pupils will have a chance to unleash their creative juices and expand their vocabulary.

 

P2 to P5 Holiday Camps

Looking to give your child a head start for next year? We are offering a variety of English and Maths programmes that you can choose to give your child practice in – creative writing, oral presentation, English paper 2 and Maths word problems.

 

P6 Intro to Sec 1 

How English is tested in secondary school is vastly different from primary school. This programme is designed to give your child a taste of what the secondary English papers are like, so that they start the school year with a clearer idea of what is expected of them.

A brief summary of the course contents is as follows:

  • Day 1: Editing & Situational Writing
  • Day 2: Continuous Writing
  • Day 3: Visual Text Comprehension
  • Day 4: Reading Comprehension & Summary Writing
  • Day 5: Listening Comprehension & Oral

 

Spaces are limited, so call 6777 2468 or SIGN UP ONLINE today!

Upcoming Parent Workshops

Ever wondered why your child is unable to apply the Maths concepts learnt to his/her exam paper? It is because not all students are able to bridge the gap between what is taught in schools and what is tested in the exams themselves. It is often higher-order, non-routine problem sums which students have difficulty with.

At this hands-on workshop, pick up tips and tricks and gain exposure to skills and strategies which you can immediately apply to help your child solve word problems.

 

Did you know that for secondary school Editing, unlike primary school where the errors are underlined, the errors are unmarked and students have to be able to find the errors themselves as well as identify two lines that are error free?

Did you know that secondary school Visual Text Comprehension questions test students’ critical thinking skills and their ability to evaluate the use of visuals and use of language for impact?

Get mentally prepared and find out exactly how different secondary English is from primary English by attending our workshop!

 

Join us at our hands-on Maths workshop to learn from our Head of Mathematics as she shares how model drawing can be effectively applied to make solving word problems easy. A visual means of helping young children “see” the word problem, model drawing can be a very useful tool when used the correct way.

 

Spaces are limited, so call 6777 2468 or SIGN UP ONLINE today!

LiteracyPlus Tidbits: Run-on Sentences

 BEING AWARE OF RUN-ON SENTENCES

 

A common mistake that pupils make in their writing is run-on sentences. A run-on sentence consists of two or more independent clauses that are run together without proper punctuation. (An independent clause is a clause that can stand by itself as a complete sentence.)

Incorrect: Pain surged through Amy’s leg she screamed.

Correct: Pain surged through Amy’s leg. She screamed.

 

Another way to correct a run-on sentence is to connect the independent clauses with a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so). However, when doing so, there must be a comma before the coordinating conjunction.

Incorrect: I felt hungry, I ate an apple.

Correct: I felt hungry, so I ate an apple.

 

We sometimes speak in run-on sentences, but we add pauses and change our tone so people can understand us. When we write, no one can hear us. Hence, pupils need to be careful not to blindly write the way they speak.

 

Another thing that pupils need to be aware of is that if a sentence is long, it does not necessarily mean the sentence is a run-on. A sentence may be long but grammatically correct. For example:

Almost at the finish line, Terry picked up her pace in order to further distance herself from the rest of her competitors and to show her father, who was watching her in the stands, that all her hard work was going to pay off.

 

A good composition should be written with sentences of varying lengths. In an attempt to achieve this, pupils need to be careful that they aren’t writing run-on sentences instead.

 

Oral Tips: Pronunciation

PRONUNCIATION

 

Commonly mispronounced words in Singapore:

 

Word Correct Pronunciation Incorrect Pronunciation
abacus A-ba-cus a-BAC-cus
baton ba-TON BAY-ten
calendar CA-len-der ca-LAN-der
calligraphy ca-LIG-gra-phy ca-li-GRAPH-y
chick CHICK CHEEK
comparable COM-pa-re-ble com-PARE-re-bel
economy e-CON-no-my e-co-NO-my
entrepreneur en-tre-pre-NEUR en-tre-PRE-neur

 

LiteracyPlus Tidbits: Oral Communication Skills

BUILDING ORAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS

 

The ability to communicate effectively is an important skill. Cultivating good oral communication skills takes practice and reinforcement. Thankfully, there are many ways that parents can incorporate the teaching and reinforcement of oral communication skills in everyday situations.

 

Keep It Casual

Have your child share about his/her day, or any topic of interest, but have him/her do so facing you so you can focus on your child’s posture, eye contact and voice projection. Content does not always have to be a priority. You want to ingrain good foundational oral skills in your child.

 

Poetry

Poetry is a great tool to practise delivery skills. Select a short, funny poem as ‘Poem of the Week’ for your child to practise with.

 

Once Upon A Time

Use short sentences from well-known stories or fairy tales for your child to practise oral delivery skills. “Who ate my porridge?” (Goldilocks and the Three Bears) and “I will huff, and I will puff, and I will blow your house down!” (The Three Little Pigs), for example, are great for children to practise tone, facial expressions and voice projection. Encourage your child to come up with other good sentences from his/her favourite stories.

 

The Big “C”

Consistency is key! Practising good oral communication skills should not only be done close to exams, but across the board at all times. Be vigilant in correcting your child’s incorrect pronunciation and incorrect language usage. (I want go toilet vs. I would like to use the washroom.)

 

Oral Tips: SBC

STIMULUS-BASED CONVERSATION

 

Tip #1

Do not give one word ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ answers. Instead, elaborate your answers when responding.

Don’t stop after saying something general. Remember the 5Ws and 1H (who, what, when, where, why & how) to help you elaborate.

 

Tip #2

Carry on your conversation with the examiner until he/she asks you to stop. When you close your conversation, remember to go back to the topic in your conclusion (e.g. Singapore will be a more gracious society and a happier place in which to live if we are all kind to the elderly. After all, we will all grow old one day too!).

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