Writing Tips: Narrative Writing

NARRATIVE WRITING

 

Tip #1

Gather story ideas from reading the news

Read the news daily for story ideas, or at least skim through the headlines. For example, the following news stories would be relevant content for a compo prompt on courage:

  • Students who helped boy trapped under car receives SCDF awards
  • SCDF officers to the rescue as flood waters rise
  • 78-year-old woman fights off armed robber at convenience store

 

 

 

 

Tip #2

Flesh out the climax

Make sure your climax is engaging and has sufficient detail.

Did you…

  • include your characters’ feelings, actions and thoughts?
  • use the five senses (beyond sight) to paint a vivid scene?
  • break down important actions into smaller steps?

Negative Example: The robber demanded for money.

Positive Example: One of the burly men fished a gun out of his baggy pockets and pointed it at the shopkeeper’s forehead. Advancing slowly towards the shaking shopkeeper, he roared, “Fill my bag up now!”

 

 

 

Tip #3

Use figurative language

Use the acronym MS HIP to help liven up your writing.

  • Metaphors:            The classroom became a zoo once Ms Lee left.
  • Similes:                   He avoided the water like the plague.
  • Hyperbole:             Old Mr Ong has been working here since the Stone Age.
  • Idioms:                    Our star player had fallen sick at the eleventh hour.
  • Personification:     Fear robbed me of my words.

 

 

 

For more writing tips on the various types of compositions students will have to write in either primary or secondary school, click on the following links below:

Primary School

Secondary School

English Usage Tips

VOCABULARY

 

  • “Fewer” refers to items you can count individually

Incorrect: There are less pupils attending today.

Correct:  There are fewer pupils attending today.

 

  • “Less” refers to a commodity, such as sand or water, that you can’t count individually

Incorrect: My sister eats fewer rice than I do at dinner.

Correct:  My sister eats less rice than I do at dinner.

 

 

For more vocabulary tips, click the following links below:

For some grammar and punctuation tips, click the following links below:

PSLE Intensive Prgm – Sep 2019 | EL & MA

Come join our PSLE intensive programmes (English & Maths) during the September Holidays!

Primary 6

Creative Writing Camp (9-13 Sep, 10.30am-12.30pm)

  • Raise your content score by improving on story flow and logic. Analyse writing samples and learn to rectify content errors.

Paper 2 Camp (9-13 Sep, 1.30pm-3.30pm)

  • Gear up for the PSLE by focusing on Reading Comprehension, Editing, Cloze Passage and Synthesis & Transformation.

Maths Camp (16-20 Sep, 2.00pm-4.00pm)

  • Gain a competitive edge for the PSLE by mastering key Mathematical concepts and practicing with actual past PSLE questions.

 

Spaces are limited, so call 6777 2468 or SIGN UP ONLINE today!

Writing Tips

EXPOSITORY WRITING

 

Tip #1

Understand the different types of expository essays

  • Definition essays explain the meaning of a word, term, or concept.
  • Classification essays break down a subject or idea into categories and groups.
  • Compare & Contrast essays describe the similarities and differences between two or more people, places, or things.
  • Cause & Effect essays delve into the reasons that cause something and then discuss its results or effects.
  • “How to” essays explain a procedure, step-by-step process, or how to do something.

 

 

 

Tip #2

Ask yourself questions when proofreading and revising

  • Does my essay give an unbiased analysis that unfolds logically?
  • Are my facts and examples relevant?
  • Do I use effective transitions between sentences and paragraphs?
  • Does my conclusion communicate the value and meaning of the thesis and key supporting ideas?

If your essay is still missing the mark, take another look at your thesis statement. A solid thesis statement leads to a solid essay.

 

 

 

For more writing tips on the various types of compositions students will have to write in either primary or secondary school, click on the following links below:

Primary School

Secondary School

P6 PSLE Oral Programme (5-8 Aug)

Boost your child’s confidence in taking the PSLE oral exam. Hone vocal delivery skills through exercises, build vocabulary and practice tips on how to prepare for the Stimulus-based conversation.

 

Click the image below for more information:

 

Click the image below for the course outline:

 

Spaces are limited, so call 6777 2468 or SIGN UP ONLINE today!

Holiday Programmes June 2019 | MA & EL

Engage your child over this June holiday with our Maths and English programmes! Join us for something fun but with an academic focus.

 

Primary 3

Maths Camp (17-19 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Master model drawing, develop mathematical reasoning and learn foolproof concepts that will save you time.

Creative Writing Camp (24-26 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Become a better writer through experiential learning. Visit various places and translate the experience onto paper in the classroom.

 

Primary 4

Maths Camp (17-19 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Solidify your understanding of foundational word problem topics and learn to apply critical concepts vital for your exams.

Creative Writing Camp (24-28 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Hone your visualisation skills and descriptive writing skills through the use of various drama activities like role play.

 

Primary 5

Maths Camp (10-12 Jun or 17-19 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Excel in applying must-know concepts and in solving commonly-tested question types that many pupils struggle with.

Creative Writing Camp (17-21 Jun or 24-28 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • With elements of peer presentation and peer teaching, learn from actual pupil writing samples to improve on content.

 

Primary 6

Maths Camp (10-14 Jun or 17-21 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Gain a competitive edge for the PSLE by mastering key Mathematical concepts and practicing with actual past PSLE questions.

Creative Writing Camp (17-21 Jun or 24-28 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Raise your content score by improving on story flow and logic. Analyse writing samples and learn to rectify content errors.

Paper 2 Camp (17-21 Jun or 24-28 Jun, 12.15pm-2.15pm)

  • Gear up for the PSLE by focusing on Reading Comprehension, Editing, Cloze Passage and Synthesis & Transformation.

 

 

Click the image below for our schedule of holiday programmes:

 

2019 June Holiday Camp Schedule

 

Spaces are limited, so call 6777 2468 or SIGN UP ONLINE today!

English Usage Tips: Grammar

GRAMMAR: CONTRACTIONS

 

  • “They’re” is short for “they are”.

Incorrect: Their going to be home soon.

Correct:  They’re going to be home soon.

 

  • “Their” is the possessive form of “they” and indicates something belonging to someone.

Incorrect: Can we borrow they’re car?

Correct: Can we borrow their car?

 

  • “Thererefers to a particular place that is not where you are. We also use “there” to show something exists.

Incorrect: Their is a new shop next door.

Correct: There is a new shop next door.

 

English Usage Tips: Punctuation

PUNCTUATION: APOSTROPHES

 

  • Apostrophes indicate possession – something belonging to something or someone. 

Incorrect: Jennifers horse is over there.

Correct: Jennifer’s horse is over there.

To indicate something belonging to one person, the apostrophe goes before the ‘s’.

 

Incorrect: The postman delivered the parcel to the Ng’s flat.

Correct: The postman delivered the parcel to the Ngs’ flat.

To indicate something belonging to more than one person, put the apostrophe after the ‘s’.

 

 

 

  • Apostrophes are never used to make a word plural, even when a word is in number form, as in a date.

Incorrect: We received a Chinese New Year card from the Lee’s.

Correct: We received a Chinese New Year card from the Lees.

Incorrect: My parents like to listen to music from the 1970’s.

Correct: My parents like to listen to music from the 1970s.

 

 

  • Apostrophes are also used to indicate a contraction.

Contractions are two words made shorter by placing an apostrophe where letters have been omitted. For example, “let’s” uses an apostrophe to indicate that the word is missing the “u” from “us”.

 

English Usage Tips: Grammar

GRAMMAR: PREPOSITIONS

  • on OR in OR at?

A:  Listen – is this right: ‘I live on 99 Bishan Road’?

B:  No, that’s wrong! You live in 99 Bishan Road.

C:  Both wrong! You live at 99 Bishan Road.

Who is right? In is generally used when we talk about a location ‘inside’ something (in the house, in the theatre). On is used for a location ‘on top of’ something (on the table, on the floor), and at is used for a location which is a point on a horizontal or vertical surface (at the end of the drive, at the window). The problem is that there are different ways of looking at the same location.

But C is right.

At is used when street numbers are mentioned because we think of a particular point along the street, namely No. 99.

 

1 2 3 4